0

Colonial Williamsburg — Duke of Gloucester Street

It is a common sight in the South to place large trees near buildings for shade and temperature control in the hot summer months. The Red Lion has a particularly wild tree gracing its yard.

Convoluted Tree at the Red Lion

Convoluted Tree at the Red Lion

Many properties included gardens in the back of the property. These gardens were often very structured and delimited by walkways, walls, fences and other devices to impose geometric precision on otherwise wandering plants. Necessary outbuildings such as this shed offer aesthetic accents to the appearance of the garden.

Garden Shed

Garden Shed

Extending the life of the garden plants is important. Wicker covers and glass bell jars are used to protect plants from cold fall nights and possible frost.

Wicker Covers warm and protect plants from cold nights

Wicker Covers warm and protect plants from cold nights

Military detachments camped around the capital city in regimented clusters of tents.

Military Tents

Military Tents

Everyone in Colonial Williamsburg offered smiles and answers to thoughtful or silly questions. This young lady was bundled in many layers to endure the early winter chill.

Re-enactor welcomes visitors to the Silversmith Shop

Re-enactor welcomes visitors to the Silversmith Shop

I’m not sure how common it was in olden times, but in today’s Colonial Williamsburg they build small bonfires at numerous places around the town so that visitors have a chance to warm up while they visit. You’ll see large piles of wood throughout the area, obviously used to heat the buildings as well as supply the bonfires.

Bonfires warm visitors on the street

Bonfires warm visitors on the street

Share This Page...Pin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

Mark Bobb

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Solve Security Question *