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Grenada – Yankee Clipper

The Yankee Clipper is a 197-foot sail boat with a 30-foot beam and 17-foot draft.  She had 32 guest cabins (64 berths), plus a crew of 30.  Originally built for the Vanderbilts in 1927 as one of the only armor plated private yachts in the world, she was considered one of the fastest ships on the west coast.  It is believed the Yankee Clipper is now in Trinidad, after the demise of Windjammer Barefoot Cruises in 2008.

Lesser Antilles Islands map

Our week-long cruise was a circle tour of the Lesser Antilles islands between Grenada and St. Vincent and the Grenadines.  Grenada and St. Vincent are part of a forty five island, twenty nation group known as the Lesser Antilles Islands.

Yankee Clipper at sunset.

Yankee Clipper at sunset.

Helmsman in the early morning, and a sail filled with the wind.

Helmsman in the early morning, and a sail filled with the wind.

Helmsman in the early morning, and a sail filled with the wind.

Helmsman in the early morning, and a sail filled with the wind.

Our cabin was small with bunk beds, but the nights were so comfortable that I often slept on the main deck, watching the stars and occasional clouds.

Ropes on a sailboat are called “lines”, and the crew coils the lines neatly for both appearance and safety.  It wouldn’t do to have the line knotted up when trying to perform some important task quickly.

Coiled line of rope

Coiled line of rope

The sails are so large that a 3-stage pulley is needed to set their position.  Guests were allowed, and even encouraged, to help “set the sails” during our voyage.  This essentially meant a group of people would pull on a line to raise or lower the sail.

Pulley on sails

Pulley on sails

One night a local group of musicians came about to provide an evening’s entertainment.  They were enthusiastic, but were not always playing together.

Patang-Band-2

References:

Vessel Details – Yankee Clipper

Lesser Antilles

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Mark Bobb

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